Draft 2040 OCP

Future Land Use

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Last Updated: 
September 17, 2021

DRAFT VERSION FOR REVIEW - FALL 2021

2040 OCP - Chapter 3 - Future Land Use chapter header, image of industrial zoned area in Kelowna

The Future Land Use Designations for the Official Community Plan are outlined below and illustrated in Map 3.1 – Future Land Use. They were developed using the Growth Strategy outlined in Chapter 1: The Big Picture and the projections and residential unit targets outlined in Chapter 2: Planning Context. They both inform and respond to the policies and directions set out in the Transportation Master Plan and the 20 Year Servicing Plan.

While the Future Land Use designations establish a general land use vision for Kelowna, it is the Zoning Bylaw that regulates the specific uses and density that are permitted to occur on the land. Each Future Land Use designation includes a range of uses, densities and forms to guide decision-making for development in a particular neighbourhood or property. However, the intent is to guide site-specific land use decisions that consider the site’s characteristics and context, as well as all relevant 2040 OCP policies and supplementary plans.

As such, not every property will achieve the full development potential outlined by these land use designations. For some proposals, a land assembly may be required for a project to achieve a designation’s intent. This also means that where densities are assigned to Future Land Use designations, they are intended to guide decision making and infrastructure planning, not act as maximum densities.

Future Land Use Designations
Urban Centres (UC)

Growth Strategy Role
Urban Centres are the City’s largest activity hubs. They are characterized by the largest concentration of commercial and employment uses in the city, arts and cultural services, a mix of high density residential development, and a high quality public realm. They offer the most walkable environments, have the best transit service and the greatest access to active transportation and shared mobility options.

There are five Urban Centres in Kelowna: Downtown, Pandosy, Capri Landmark, Midtown and Rutland, each of them with their own unique characteristics. The Urban Centres focus anticipated growth to provide a greater variety of housing and employment closer together. This makes more effective use of infrastructure investments, promotes transit use, walking and biking and reduces development pressure in rural and agricultural areas.

Supported Uses and Typologies
This designation is characterized by the highest densities of mixed-use, commercial, institutional and residential uses in the city, as well as other uses that support a vibrant and growing urban neighbourhood. Commercial uses are located at grade with commercial and/or residential uses located above.

More detailed policy for the Urban Centres can be found in Chapter 4: Urban Centres.

Table 3.1: Urban Centres Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Commercial, including office, retail and visitor accommodation
  • Multi-unit residential
  • Apartment housing
  • Mixed use development
  • Institutional
Village Centre (VC)

Growth Strategy Role
Village Centres act as smaller hubs of activity in the city serving their immediate surroundings, providing basic day-to-day services within a short walking or biking trip. This contributes to the overall livability of Core Area, Gateway and Suburban Neighbourhoods by providing these options closer to residents. Village Centres in the Core Area would typically have a larger commercial component, servicing a more densely populated neighbourhood, while Village Centres in Suburban Neighbourhoods would likely have a smaller commercial component and serve a more sparsely populated neighbourhood. The University South Village Centre plays a unique role in the Gateway, serving growth at UBCO.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Village Centres should support a mix of commercial and multi-unit residential uses that form an activity hub, serving nearby neighbourhoods. Commercial floor space is typically between 3,000 and 15,000 square metres. Residential uses are supported at grade and commercial uses would be located at grade along key transportation routes or as signaled in more detailed policy.

More detailed policy for the Village Centres can be found in Chapter 5: The Core Area, Chapter 6: Gateway and Chapter 7: Suburban Neighbourhoods.

Table 3.2: Village Centres Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Multi-unit residential
  • Apartment housing
  • Mixed use development
  • Commercial, including small scale office, retail
  • Institutional
  • Tourist accommodation (Cook Truswell Village Centre only)
  • Approximately 2.0 or as guided by policy.
  • ​Approximately 3,000 – 15,000 m2 of commercial floor space. Core Area Village Centres are expected to be larger than Suburban Village Centres
Core Area Neighbourhood (C-NHD)

Growth Strategy Role
Core Area Neighbourhoods will accommodate much of the city’s growth through sensitive residential infill, some low rise buildings permitted in strategically located properties, and more opportunities for local commercial and institutional development. Except where located along a Transit Supportive Corridor, new development would be largely in keeping with the existing scale and building orientation of the neighbourhood to maintain the overall feel, particularly in Heritage Conservation Areas. Residents of Core Area Neighbourhoods would have easier access to Urban Centres and Village Centres for many of their day-to-day shopping and employment needs while their alignment along Transit Supportive and Active Transportation Corridors would make it easier to reach other areas of the city without a car.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Core Area Neighbourhoods should support a variety of ground-oriented housing types, including small lot single detached housing, two-dwelling housing, secondary suites, carriage houses and ground-oriented multi-unit housing. Small-scale local commercial and institutional uses that serve the surrounding residents, like corner stores, daycares and places of worship, are also supported in Core Area Neighbourhoods.

Stacked townhouses and low rise apartments are supported adjacent to Transit Supportive Corridors, with mixed use commercial and residential development supported by policy. Consideration for these uses and typologies in areas not adjacent to Transit Supportive Corridors may be considered strategically on larger sites where a project provides affordable housing, amenity space, and parks, and transitions sensitively into adjacent neighbourhoods as guided by Policy 5.3.3: Strategic Density.

In the Abbott Street and Marshall Street Heritage Conservation Areas, future development will respect the character of those neighbourhoods as outlined in Policy 5.3.7: Respect the Heritage Conservation Area and Chapter 23: Heritage Conservation Area.

Additional policy direction for Core Area Neighbourhoods can be found in Chapter 5: The Core Area.

Table 3.3: Core Area Neighbourhood Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Single and two dwelling residential
  • Secondary suites and carriage houses
  • Ground-oriented multi-unit residential
  • Small-scale commercial and institutional
  • Stacked townhouses*
  • Apartment housing*
  • Mixed use development*
  • Attached and detached buildings up to 3 storeys
  •  Multi-unit buildings up to approximately 6 storeys*
  • Sensitive infill in keeping with neighbourhood scale and orientation
  • Buildings oriented to Transit Supportive Corridor
  • Sensitivity to Heritage Conservation Areas

 

* As guided by policy.

Core Area – Health District (C-HTH)

Growth Strategy Role
The Health District supports the operations of Kelowna General Hospital campus and associated health care uses and integrates the campus with the surrounding neighbourhoods, recognizing their unique heritage character.

Supported Uses and Typologies
The Health District integrates uses in support of the Kelowna General Hospital campus with the surrounding communities and provides a moderating transition in scale from a major institutional centre to adjacent established residential areas that incorporate heritage components. Accordingly, the Health District will accommodate a range of health focused uses that complement the Kelowna General Hospital including health administration, health education, patient services or care facility operation.

The Health District designation also encompasses a range of residential uses that are intended to support the hospital as well as transition between the hospital and surrounding low density residential areas. Based on the location within the hospital district, residential uses envisioned include ground-oriented residential forms such as row housing, stacked townhouses and low rise apartments in cases where lots are assembled and an adequate transition is provided with surrounding neighbourhoods. Integration of health services with these residential uses is encouraged.

Table 3.4: Core Area - Health District Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Institutional (health services)
  • Ground- oriented multi-unit residential
  • Small-scale commercial
  • Apartment housing
  • Attached and detached buildings up to 3 storeys
  •  Multi-unit buildings up to approximately 6 storeys*
  • Development should be consistent with the Hospital Area Plan

*As guided by policy.

Suburban – Residential (S-RES)

Growth Strategy Role
Suburban Residential lands will accommodate most of the city’s single and two dwelling residential growth in the Suburban Neighbourhoods and Gateway Districts using clustering and neighbourhood design that responds to the surrounding context, including hillsides and environmentally sensitive areas. 

Supported Uses and Typologies
These portions of suburban neighbourhoods support single and two dwelling housing, with opportunities for secondary suites and carriage houses. Complementary uses such as minor care centres and home-based businesses may also be supported, but larger non-residential uses in Suburban Neighbourhoods should be directed towards Neighbourhood Commercial or Village Centre lands.

Where Suburban Residential lands are located in areas with 20% slopes or greater, subdivision and zoning proposals should align with the hillside context.

Additional policy direction for Suburban Residential lands can be found in Chapter 6: Gateway and Chapter 7: Suburban Neighbourhoods.

Table 3.5: Suburban - Residential Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Single and two dwelling residential 
  • Secondary suites and carriage houses
  • Small scale institutional uses
  • Attached and detached buildings
  • N/A 
  • Considerations for hillside and environmental context
Suburban – Multiple Unit (S-MU)

Growth Strategy Role
Suburban Multiple Unit lands support a greater variety of multi-unit housing in the Gateway and Suburban Neighbourhoods, located strategically to support the viability of local commercial areas, Village Centres and, in some cases, transit service, schools and other community amenities. Some Suburban Multiple Unit lands are located in the Rural Lands District to reflect existing multi-unit development only. 

Supported Uses and Typologies
Suburban Multiple Unit lands support various forms of single and two family residential, ground oriented multi-unit housing, including house-plexes,  row housing and low rise apartments. Small scale commercial or institutional uses may be incorporated into Suburban Multiple Unit lands where they are integrated into the larger residential component. 

Additional policy direction for Suburban Multiple Unit lands can be found in Chapter 6: Gateway, Chapter 7: Suburban Neighbourhoods and Chapter 8: Rural Lands.  

Table 3.6: Suburban - Multiple Unit Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Single and two dwelling residential 
  • Ground-oriented multi-unit residential 
  • Low rise apartments 
  • Secondary suites and carriage houses
  • Attached and detached buildings up to 4 storeys 
  • Up to approximately 1.3 
  • Considerations for hillside and environmental context
Regional Commercial (RCOM)

Growth Strategy Role
Regional Commercial lands accommodate the large format retail and commercial uses that are expected to be more commonly accessed by car over the 20 year life of this plan. While many areas in the City are strategically targeted to redevelop into higher density mixed use neighbourhoods, the Regional Commercial lands, for the 20 year life of this OCP, are intended to continue to capture the growth of larger format commercial and service commercial uses.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Regional Commercial lands are characterized by large format development for the sale of goods and services and includes businesses that require extensive onsite storage as well as service commercial uses. Office uses may be considered where secondary to commercial uses and where they are located on the second storey or above.

While residential uses may be present in some circumstances, they are secondary to the commercial uses and their location must be carefully considered based on proximity and access to amenities like parks and schools as well as adjacent uses as guided by Policy 5.6.6.

Additional policy direction for Regional Commercial lands can be found in Chapter 5: Core Area and Chapter 6: Gateway

Table 3.7: Regional Commercial Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Commercial, including, retail, tourist accommodation and small scale office
  • Service commercial
  • Apartment housing* 
  • Buildings up to approximately 4 storeys 
  • N/A 
  • Considerations for transit orientation and pedestrian safety and comfort 

* Where guided by policy in Chapter 5: Core Area

Neighbourhood Commercial (NCOM)

Growth Strategy Role
Neighbourhood Commercial areas are envisioned to support small scale commercial development in Suburban Neighbourhoods and Rural Lands to provide basic day to day services in closer proximity to those residents. This allows residents of these neighbourhoods to access these services by way of a walk, bicycle trip or a shorter drive that reduces demand on the City’s major road network.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Neighbourhood Commercial development is characterized by buildings with commercial uses at grade of primarily one to two storey development, and where in keeping with the neighbourhood context, up to approximately four storeys. Commercial floor space is typically up to approximately 3,000 square metres.

Table 3.8: Neighbourhood Commercial Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Retail commercial
  • Apartment housing above the first floor
  • Buildings up to approximately 4 storeys  
  • Up to approximately 3,000 m2 of commercial space 
  • Integration with surrounding neighbourhoods 
Industrial (IND)

Growth Strategy Role
Industrial lands are an important component to Kelowna’s economic development and diversification. However, in a growing city, uses on these lands are often outcompeted for commercial and residential uses, eroding this local employment base. As outlined in the Growth Strategy, industrial lands should be protected, but new and creative ways for these lands to maintain the economic viability are key to retaining them as a critical piece of Kelowna’s future as it grows.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Industrial lands consist of a range of manufacturing, production, repair, processing, storage and distribution activities. Office space is discouraged but may be supported where ancillary to the primary industrial activities. Industrial uses that are characterized by higher employment densities should be located near or adjacent to Urban Centres or within the Core Area. Industrial uses with larger footprints and massing would be directed to the Gateway.

Complementary uses, such as retail associated with the production on site and restaurants, would be supported in these areas, but would be secondary to the production activities that characterize these areas.

Additional policy direction for Industrial lands can be found in Chapter 5: Core Area and Chapter 6: Gateway.  

Table 3.9: Industrial Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Industrial uses including manufacturing, repair, processing, storage and distribution
  • Accessory retail and office space
  • Buildings up to approximately 4 storeys 
  • N/A 
  • Sensitive transitions into adjacent neighbourhoods 
  • Higher employment densities in Core Area, lower employment densities in the Gateway
Educational / Institutional (EDINST)

Growth Strategy Role
The location of key educational and institutional uses, such as schools, post-secondary institutions and hospitals, is critical to the quality of life of Kelowna residents. As neighbourhoods evolve and change as the city grows, the City, senior levels of government and other key institutions must be well positioned to offer their services in areas that are close to areas targeted for growth, easy to access by modes other than the automobile and be well designed and integrated into the surrounding neighbourhood.

Increasing development pressure may result in the loss of institutional lands, making it more difficult for those uses to be accommodated in the future. Any proposals for new uses, such as residential development, should considered carefully on a site by site basis.

Supported Uses and Typologies
The Educational / Institutional designation signals where key educational, cultural, government and religious activities take place. The designation is characterized by schools, hospitals, places of worship, recreation centres and other facilities that provide public services delivered by governments or not-for-profit institutions.

Table 3.10: Educational / Institutional Summary 
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Schools and post secondary institutions
  • Government and not-for-profit offices and services
  • Health services
  • Cultural and recreation facilities
  • Places of worship
  • Shelters and supportive housing
  • Various
  •  N/A 
  • N/A
Rural – Residential (R-RES)

Growth Strategy Role
Rural Residential lands have been developed for low density residential use and are generally located outside of the Permanent Growth Boundary (PGB) in the Rural Lands district. Due to their rural location, these areas may or may not have urban utility services. However, some residential neighbourhoods that have servicing or are signaled for servicing for health and safety reasons are also included in this designation. No further intensification would be supported in these locations, as doing so would increase interface issues with agricultural lands and places a greater burden on transportation and utility infrastructure. However, secondary suites within a primary building are supported and carriage houses may be considered in certain circumstances. 

Supported Uses and Typologies
Rural Residential lands support primarily single dwelling housing on larger lots, as well as complementary uses that do not place a significant burden on the limited utility and transportation infrastructure in these areas, such as home-based businesses, home based child care centres and secondary suites.

Additional policy direction for Rural Residential lands can be found in Chapter 8: Rural Lands.  

Table 3.11: Rural Residential Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Single dwelling housing
  • Secondary suites and carriage houses. 
  • Low impact complementary uses
  • Single detached homes
  • N/A 
  • Limited urban services
Rural – Agricultural and Resource (R-AGR)

Growth Strategy Role
The Rural – Agricultural and Resource designation applies primarily to lands used for agricultural purposes both inside and outside of the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR).  The designation also includes lands that are not actively farmed, but which are located outside of the Permanent Growth Boundary (PGB). This designation primarily aims to protect agricultural lands from urban encroachment and incompatible uses, and in doing so, reinforces the PGB and focuses growth into lands within the PGB.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Lands within the Rural – Agricultural and Resource designation will be supported for agricultural and resource uses, but will not be supported for urban development or for uses that could have a negative impact on agriculture.

Additional policy direction for Rural – Agricultural and Resource lands can be found in Chapter 6: Gateway and Chapter 8: Rural Lands.  

Table 3.12: Rural - Agricultural and Resource Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Single dwelling housing
  • Secondary suites
  • Carriage houses*
  • Low impact complementary uses
  • Agriculture
  • Resource extraction
  • Single detached homes
  • Agricultural structures
  • N/A 
  • Limited urban services.

*Carriage houses are not permitted on ALR lands

Parks (PARK)

Growth Strategy Role
Parks are a critical component to the success of Kelowna’s Growth Strategy given their central role in providing a high quality of life for residents. As neighbourhoods evolve and change as the city grows, the strategic location of parks will help ensure that these neighbourhoods become even more attractive, desirable places to live.

Supported Uses and Typologies
The Parks designation is characterized by public parks and outdoor recreation uses where there is a high level of activity anticipated. Limited small scale complimentary commercial or institutional uses may be supported where they enhance the enjoyment of park users.

Additional policy direction for Parks lands can be found in  Chapter 10: Parks.  

Table 3.13: Parks Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Recreation and cultural services
  • Limited retail commercial to support park uses
  • Variable to support parks uses
  •  N/A 
  • Designed for active uses.
Natural Areas (NAT)

Growth Strategy Role
As the city grows, natural areas will need to be protected and preserved for the ecological or public safety services they provide and in some cases, for the enjoyment of Kelowna residents and visitors.

Supported Uses and Typologies
The Natural Areas designation consists of lands that are intended to remain largely in their natural state, requiring little or no maintenance by the City. Wetlands, hillsides, ravines, riparian areas and other environmentally sensitive lands may be included in this designation. While the intent is for these areas to remain primarily natural, access for low impact activities, such as hiking, are supported, and as such, City, RDCO and Provincial parks may be included in the Natural Lands designation. These lands could also include infrastructure that mimics natural processes. These may include reservoirs, stormwater ponds, and channelized creeks.

Additional policy direction for Parks lands can be found in Chapter 10: Parks and Chapter 14: Natural Environment.

Table 3.14: Natural Areas Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Recreation and cultural services
  • Natural open space
  • Variable to support parks uses
  • N/A 
  • Designed for passive uses.
Private Recreational (REC)

Growth Strategy Role
Private Recreational lands are privately owned properties that complement the publicly owned parks in Kelowna by offering specific outdoor recreational activities, contributing to the quality of life of Kelowna residents and visitors.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Private Recreational lands are characterized by large scale private outdoor recreation uses where there is a high level of activity anticipated. Uses could include golf courses or driving ranges, and similar activities operating as commercial ventures or clubs.

Table 3.15: Private Recreational Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Recreation and cultural services
  • Limited retail commercial to support recreational uses
  • Variable to support recreational uses
  • N/A 
  • Designed for active uses.
Public Services / Utilities (PSU)

Growth Strategy Role
Utility and transportation infrastructure is required to provide Kelowna residents, visitors and businesses with a high quality of life, economic growth and improved health and safety outcomes.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Public Services / Utilities lands identify locations of existing and future facilities that provide utility and transportation services to the public. Such uses include the landfill operation, electrical, gas or telephone installations, sewage treatment facilities, irrigation and water infrastructure and Kelowna International Airport.

Table 3.16: Public Services / Utilities Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Utility and communication infrastructure
  • Airport and aviation uses
  • Transportation infrastructure
  • Landfill operations
  • Renewable energy infrastructure
  • Variable to support utility and transportation infrastructure uses
  • N/A 
  • As guided by OCP policy.
Transportation Corridor (TC)

Growth Strategy Role
The Transportation Corridor designation illustrates the route for the Okanagan Rail Trail, which acts as an important transportation and recreation corridor in the city.

Supported Uses and Typologies
Uses along the Transportation Corridor focus on alternatives to the private automobile. Such uses include biking and walking infrastructure, with the possibility of transit service in the future. Automobile access and use is strongly discouraged.

Table 3.17: Transportation Corridor Summary
Supported Uses Supported Forms Density (FAR)Other Characteristics
  • Transportation infrastructure
  • N/A
  • N/A 
  • Automobile access and use discouraged
First Nations Reserve (FNR)

The First Nations Reserve designation signals reserve lands as provided by the Federal Government for use by First Nations people. Okanagan Indian Band’s Reserve #7, located at the northerly limit of the city, is currently developed as industrial, manufactured home parks, recreational vehicle resorts and campgrounds. Additional development potential has not been identified at this time.

Westbank First Nation’s Reserves #8 and #12 are located in the Rural Lands District along Mission Creek near Casorso Road and towards the City’s eastern boundary. These lands today are largely rural in character and are currently in a primarily natural state.

Additional Mapping Notes

Transit Supportive Corridors
Transit Supportive Corridors are streets that are identified to support a higher density and greater mix of uses in the Core Area generally along the Frequent Transit Network where investments in transit service are anticipated, as outlined in Figure 3.1, below. In some cases, streets without planned transit service may be identified as a Transit Supportive Corridor to facilitate development that services broader land use or transportation objectives.

Detailed policy direction for development proposed along Transit Supportive Corridors can be found in Chapter 5: The Core Area.

2040 OCP - Transit supportive corridor context

Figure 3.1: Transit Supportive Corridor Context.

Permanent Growth Boundary
Lands within the Permanent Growth Boundary may be considered for urban uses within the 20 year planning horizon ending 2040. Lands outside the Permanent Growth Boundary will not be supported for urban uses. ALR and non-ALR land outside the Permanent Growth Boundary will not be supported for any further parcelization.

Temporary Use Permits
In accordance with the Local Government Act Section 492, an Official Community Plan may designate areas where Council may consider allowing temporary uses, and may specify general conditions regarding the issuance of temporary use permits in those areas. The temporary use designation is intended to apply to operations that are temporary in nature and the designation does not in itself permit specific uses on the designated sites. Within these areas, Council may, by resolution, issue a Temporary Use Permit and specify the conditions under which the temporary use be carried on. Upon the expiration of a Temporary Use Permit, the permitted uses revert to those outlined in the Zoning Bylaw.

Temporary Use Permits may be considered within the Permanent Growth Boundary (PGB) on all lands designated as Urban Centre, Village Centre, Regional Commercial, Neighbourhood Commercial, Education / Institutional, Industrial, or Public Service / Utility. Temporary Use Permits outside the PGB may be considered on lands designated Rural – Agricultural and Resource, with a stated time period considerably less than the maximum three year time limit. A Temporary Use Permit on lands in the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) will require the approval of the Agricultural Land Commission (ALC). All Temporary Use Permits must conform to other policy direction in this OCP, including fit within the character of the neighbourhood and surrounding uses. Appropriate landscaping, screening and buffering will be included as conditions of the permit to protect adjacent land uses.