Draft 2040 OCP - Form & Character

Comprehensive Zone 24

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Last Updated: 
September 17, 2021

DRAFT VERSION FOR REVIEW - FALL 2021

2040 OCP - Form and Character Guidelines - Comprehensive Zone 24 header image, aerial shot of Kelowna

8.0  Comprehensive Development Zone 24

The development envisioned under the CD24 zone is to be a place where a sense of community thrives and pride in the neighbourhood is evident. The CD24 development will be an inviting and sustainable mixed-use commercial residential neighbourhood that will support the tourism potential of this unique area of Kelowna.  The overall vision for CD24 is forward thinking; incorporating principles of smart growth development, a high level of urban design and best management practices for sustainability.  The following are the over-arching development objectives for CD24:

  • Promote the City of Kelowna’s vision for new communities and development, as outlined in Chapter 5.0 of the 2030 Official Community Plan (OCP): develop in a sustainable manner; focus development in established growth areas; ensure appropriate and context sensitive built form; create a sense of community; provide high quality urban design; create opportunities for greater pedestrian, active transportation and public transit use.
  • Promote the creation of a Complete Communities and Compact Urban Form that combines a variety of residential building types with a tourism based commercial and retail component that is responsive to the surrounding context.
  • Promote a pedestrian-oriented lifestyle community that integrates mixed-use development with park-like open spaces that are inter-connected by pathways both internally and externally.
  • Promote the construction of energy efficient buildings and best management practices with regards to sustainability initiatives for community design, energy efficiency, reduced water consumption, active transportation, increased biodiversity and preservation of ecology.
2040 OCP - Comprehensive Zone 24, site area2040 OCP - Comprehensive Zone 24, mixed use
Site PlanMixed Use

The following Design Guidelines will ensure a harmonious understanding of the ‘vision’, with a strong focus on environmental, economic and social sustainability.

8.1 Using the Design Guidelines

Overview

These Design Guidelines form part of a Comprehensive Development (CD24) agreement that will shape the future of this multi-phased mixed-use development.  The site has been divided into two distinct areas (Area A and Area B).  Area A has both residential and commercial uses and Area B has only residential uses.  As such, these guidelines have been structured to include overall guidelines for both Area A and Area B and commercial specific guidelines for Area A.

2040 OCP - Comprehensive Zone 24, image of Area A and B

The intent of the Design Guidelines is to provide the following:

  • Provide the framework that will be used by individuals preparing the form and character Development Permit applications relating to buildings and open spaces within the CD24 boundary.
  • Assist the City of Kelowna’s planning staff with individual Development Permit applications within the CD24 boundary.
  • Provide general guidance as to the level of detailed design needed to ensure that each individual development is compatible with the overall urban design concept established for CD24 Zone. 
  • Provide, through high-level graphic examples, to illustrate potential applications of the design guidelines.
  • These guidelines are not intended to be the final form of development, but rather represent a ‘conforming outline’ to be used as a starting point for detailed design to build upon.
8.2 Guiding principles

Guiding principles represent the larger planning and design objectives that are to be reinforced whenever possible during subsequent development stages.

8.2.1 Land Use Principles
  • The development of the CD24 site will incorporate a mix of land uses including retail, commercial, hotel and residential with associated residential uses. 
  • Land use for the CD24 site has been allocated to two different areas (‘Area A’ and ‘Area B’).
  • Area A’s core land use will be tourism-based commercial that includes hotel and conference space, ground floor retail, and residential use located above retail.  Commercial development will be complemented with an urban plaza space that accommodates some surface parking. 
  • Area A’s building forms respond to the Lakeshore Road frontage and will have a landmark structure in terms of scale and architecture.
  • Area B’s land use will be residential, with no commercial or retail use, and will be complemented by an inter-connected network of landscaped open spaces.
  • Area B’s building forms will be mid-rise, multi-unit structures that step back in height from the site edges in response to adjacent existing residential.
  • Vehicular traffic within the site will be accommodated by an internal road network, with limited surface parking and an easily accessible parking structure.
8.2.2 Sustainability Principles
  • To promote higher density mixed-use development near existing communities and public infrastructure to reduce adverse environmental and public health effects associated with low density urban sprawl.
  • To encourage the development of energy-efficient buildings by employing strict heating and cooling strategies that will reduce dependency on natural resources.
  • To reduce pollution and flooding associated with major storm events through on-site stormwater capture and treatment to promote aquifer recharge and improve water quality by emulating natural conditions.
  • To reduce energy consumption and pollution from motor vehicles by providing high levels of external connectivity and by encouraging alternative modes of transportation such as public transit, cycling, car sharing and walking.
  • To promote a healthy lifestyle by providing safe, appealing and comfortable street, pathway and open space environments.
  • To preserve water quality, natural hydrology, habitat, and biodiversity through conservation and rehabilitation of wetlands and Wilson Creek.
  • To enable the widest spectrum of people, regardless of age or ability, to more easily participate in community life by incorporating principles of universal accessibility into the design process.
  • To promote community-based food production, access to fresh produce, and improve nutrition through provision of community gardens.
  • To limit or eliminate the use of potable water for irrigation by use of captured or recycled water for use in landscape irrigation.
  • To minimize amounts of sod lawn provided and to use a planting palette of drought tolerant native, or native-adaptive, plant species to minimize water consumption for irrigation. 
8.2.3 Urban Design Principles
  • It is the overall intent that the CD24 development site incorporates a high level of urban design and character into its buildings and outdoor open spaces that is responsive to the functional requirements of a mixed-use development, the site’s unique context, and the promotion of a pedestrian-oriented neighbourhood. 
  • Building and open space design should convey human scale, address pedestrian comfort and safety, and complement the surrounding community as well as existing buildings.
  • Create opportunities for public open space as part of the development that is safe, of high-quality and human scale.
  • Consider a road network as part of the public open space that will include amenities that promote pedestrian comfort and use.
8.2.4 Response to Context
  • Development in Area A will have a strong urban character in the treatment of buildings and open spaces in response to the context of Lakeshore Road, Manteo Resort and other major commercial developments within the Cook Road Tourist Commercial Area. 
  • Development in Area B will have a residential character through scale and material treatment of buildings, landscape buffers and landscape treatment of open spaces that respond to the context of adjacent existing residential uses.
  • Development in both Area A and Area B will respond to the highly naturalized character of the Wilson Creek wetland and riparian corridor by providing the required building setbacks from the City of Kelowna Wilson Creek Linear Park and accompanying environmental green space.
  • Character of exterior spaces and selection of plant material is to transition from cultured (inside site) to natural (edge of site at environmental riparian zone).
  • The character of buildings and public spaces within the CD24 site should celebrate that which is unique and distinctive about the Okanagan Valley by drawing inspiration from the region’s natural and cultural landscapes.
8.2.5 Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED)
  • Provide sufficient density to help ensure enough “eyes and ears” on the street.
  • Improve public safety through the creation of public spaces that instill a sense of pride and ownership. 
  • Provide natural surveillance and sight lines to ensure unobstructed views in areas where public safety and pedestrian / vehicle conflicts will be a factor.
  • Provide lighting at a sufficient enough level to uniformly light adjacent sidewalks so as to provide a high level of “psychological comfort and safety” for pedestrian use at night.
8.3 Building Siting, Massing & Proportion

The following guidelines apply to both Area A and Area B.  Additionally, at the end of each section, commercial specific guidelines for Area A only have been highlighted.

2040 OCP - Comprehensive Zone 24, Wilson Creek Green Space diagram
Wilson Creek Green Space
Building Siting, Massing & Proportion
  • In general, building massing will respond to adjacent existing land uses by stepping the heights of buildings from the edges of the site (lower building heights) to the core of site (higher building heights).
  • Where residential buildings are situated in close proximity to each other, consideration should be given to stepping back the upper floors of the building to visually reduce the massing by expanding the horizontal relationship between the upper levels when compared to the lower levels.
  • Consideration should be given at the site planning level to provide private open space at grade for each ground unit along with transitional landscaped open space from private to semi-private / semi-public space (see CD24 Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw for minimum private open space requirements).
  • Buildings should be sited with sensitivity to future development on adjacent properties and in a way that promotes the creation of functional and interconnected outdoor spaces for residents within the community.
  • Building siting should consider placement and orientation to maximize use of natural light in building design, and maximize view corridors to Wilson Creek while minimizing views into adjacent developments.
  • Buildings should demonstrate a high degree of human scale through emphasis of doors and windows and through appropriate choice of materials and surface detailing to create a rich visual interest at the pedestrian level. 
  • Building articulation refers generally to the exterior details and the arrangement of both specific and repetitive features.  As it is not intended that the CD24 site be developed under one specific architectural theme, care and attention at the preliminary design stage should be made to ensure that different architectural styles be complementary in detail to each other.
  • Building facades should have a balance of vertical and horizontal proportions. 
  • ​Vertical accents should occur on a regular basis to reinforce a pedestrian-scaled rhythm and are preferred for windows. 
  • Horizontally-extended glazed areas should be subdivided into vertically proportioned windows separated by mullions or building structure.
  • Building siting and massing for structures over 2 stories should be comprised of a podium and a tower element. 
  • Building tower and podium should be perceived as assemblages of forms through overlapping of building elements to break-up massing.  Homogenous building treatments that tend to create monolithic building massing are strongly discouraged.
  • Building towers should be designed to help reduce perceptions of bulk as well as contribute to a distinct identity for the architectural expression of development. 
  • Towers should have a minimum 25 metre separation from any other tower, with the distance between buildings measured from the nearest vertical plane, not including balconies or building overhangs.
8.4 Building Heights and Setbacks
Building Heights and Setbacks
  • The CD24 Zone prescribes minimum setbacks to the external property boundaries on the CD24 site.
  • Building heights will step in response to the prescribed setbacks as outlined in the CD24 Zone Site Setbacks.
  • Designated setback areas along the north and eastern property lines which are immediate to existing residential development should be primarily treated as semi-private to private space allowing for maximum landscape planting and screening and minimum pedestrian access.
  • In residential units located at the ground level adjacent to the Wilson Creek Green Space, it is recommended that buildings be sited to maximize the potential for on-grade outdoor private patio spaces.

8.4.1 Commercial Building Heights and Setbacks

  • The podium for each building should be no more than 3 stories above grade.  
  • Where residential uses are proposed above retail or commercial uses, the first level of residential should be set back slightly further than the commercial or retail façade.
  • Where buildings face the commercial piazza, floors above the first 2 stories should be slightly set back from the lower façade in order to create an appropriate pedestrian scale of building at the commercial level.
  • The first 2 stories of a building is where design elements can be most effective to provide a human scale to the building, regardless of its overall size and massing.  Lower levels should be designed to accentuate the horizontal elements and to provide a separation between the lower retail uses and upper mixed use levels. 
2040 OCP - Comprehensive Zone 24 - Commercial Site Access
Commercial Site Access
Building Entrances
  • All entrances should be inviting from the street and create a comfortable and welcoming experience through attention to details, proportions, materials, and lighting.
  • Principal entrances should be easy to identify from the street or any adjoining public open space. 
  • If the principal building entrance is located within a courtyard/ garden space, there should be adequate address identification in close proximity to street or adjoining open space, and an appropriate walkway through the space to the main entry door.
  • Principal entrances should include a canopy, overhang, portico or other similar structure to provide appropriate weather protection, without sacrificing visibility.
  • Principal entrances should be universally accessible. 
  • Principal entrances should be in close proximity to a vehicular lay-by or drop off area, without compromising pedestrian safety.
  • The building address should be clearly visible and located near the principle building entrance.
  • The principal entrance should be designed so that it is secure and that visitors can be identified from within the building without opening the door.
  • Secondary entrances and exits should be designed for safety and visibility.
  • If the route of access to secondary entrances crosses through a courtyard / garden space or landscaped area, there should be a defined path. 
  • If a secondary entrance is not frequently used, the pathway does not necessarily have to be a hard surface.  Crushed gravel could be an adequate treatment.

8.4.2 Commercial Building Entrances

  • Retail spaces should be easy to see into from the adjoining commercial plaza and outdoor space(s).  A high degree of transparency should not preclude use of mullion patterns to add visual interest and human scale to the building.
Building Rooftops, Balconies, Overhangs and Soffits
  • Buildings should be articulated with the aim of creating shadows through indentations and projections of elements within a façade composition on all sides – not just the front building elevation. (i.e. windows and doors, cornice lines, pilasters, balconies, and/or base-relief detailing). 
  • Buildings with flat roof areas, whether actively used or not, should be enhanced by use of texture, colour, and/or landscaping, especially when visible from habitable spaces above.
  • Rooftops designed as active outdoor social spaces are encouraged and should be designed to withstand the weight of mature trees and plantings. 
  • All mechanical equipment and elevator penthouses should be integrated with the architectural treatment of the roof, or be screened with materials and finishes compatible with the building’s design.
  • In response to a regional expression, building detailing should emphasize shade from summer sun with overhangs and recesses of sufficient depth that are appropriate responses to solar exposure.  
  • Upper levels of buildings should incorporate decks, balconies, or other building features as outdoor amenity space for occupants.  Balconies should be designed to maximize outdoor living opportunities.
  • Where appropriate, Green Roofs should be considered as a viable option to tar and gravel ballast roofs in response to sustainable building practices and the reduction of heat island effect on roofs.
  • Any soffits or the underside of any portion of a building, including the undersides of balconies, within the first 2 stories and exposed to public view should be treated in a manner as to provide visual interest and show attention to detail.

8.4.3 Commercial Building Rooftops, Balconies, Overhangs and Soffits

  • Where at-grade patios are to be provided in support of commercial uses, consideration should be given to provide a landscape buffer between the public realm and outdoor patio. 
  • Outdoor patios should be delineated with decorative fencing of a high quality and durable material (i.e. metal) and should not exceed 1.2 metres in height unless considered as part of a gateway treatment.
Exterior Materials, Treatment and Windows
  • In response to a regional expression, the character of building, detailing and selection of materials should celebrate the unique and distinctive qualities of the Okanagan Valley and draw inspiration from the region’s natural and cultural landscapes.
  • In response to a regional expression, consider techniques and treatments that emphasize the transition between inside and outside through the differing seasons such as; retractable windows, overhead rolling doors, canopies, trellises, and extended building planes.
  • Window and balcony sizes and spacing should create a comfortable rhythm that is consistent through the majority of the floors above the lowest level. 
  • Windows should be maximized to create natural light penetration into the buildings.  Positioning of windows will consider solar effects during both the hottest summer months and the cooler and greyer winter months.
  • Windows that open for natural ventilation should be encouraged, but the windows must also have a means to be secured at lower levels on the buildings.
  • Windows should incorporate an appropriate trim detail that will be suited to the exterior materials and colours of the building.
  • All roof flashings and vents exposed to public view should be painted to match adjacent surfaces or disguised in a manner consistent with the visual characteristics of the building.
  • Materials should be durable and appropriate to the character of community development.  No vinyl siding or non-vision (mirrored) window glass is to be used as part of building fenestration.
Parking, Loading, Fire and Emergency Access
  • Vehicle drop off and temporary lay-by parking should be provided in close proximity to residential buildings, or by having a single drop off serving a grouping of buildings.
  • Vehicle drop off and temporary lay-by parking should be located in a manner as to ensure adequate access by the appropriate sized vehicles, while minimizing pedestrian conflicts and visual impacts from principle building entries and outdoor patios.
  • Vehicle drop off and temporary lay-by parking should be treated so that pedestrians and vehicles have equal status.
  • Vehicle drop off and temporary lay-by parking should offer visual interest (i.e. stamped concrete, concrete pavers, etc.) such that the space takes on a higher quality and distinction from the asphalt roadway surface. 
  • The majority of the required parking will be located in parking structures.  Due to the high water table, it is not practical to construct the parking structures completely underground. 
  • Under-building parking structures should be built to internal property lines to ensure a contiguous public open space can be created on top of the structure.
  • Parking garage interconnectivity should be encouraged between adjacent building sites.
  • The lowest level parkade can have approximately ½ storey of the parking structure wall height exposed, provide that it is treated in a manner as outlined in these guidelines.
  • The second level parkade should be integrated into buildings and may include portions of the parkade structure that will have a full one-storey potentially exposed, provide that it is treated in a manner as outlined in these guidelines.
  • Exposed parkade walls in areas with no pedestrian access have the potential to be naturally ventilated using screened openings.  The design of screens should be decorative with be a powder-coated finished metal material. 
  • Exposed parkade walls in areas with pedestrian access will, at minimum, include; colour parging or cast-in-place concrete reveals, and if possible, sloped landscape with plant screening to minimize visual impact of walls. Any landscaping associated with parkade structures will consider CPTED guidelines.
  • Exposed parkade walls in areas with pedestrian access and associated with second level parking should also function as pedestrian access points to the network of open spaces by incorporated into their design stairs and/or ramps for pedestrian access. 
  • ​Terraced landscaping should be used to complement pedestrian access points and be integrated into the overall landscape open space design.
  • Exposed parkade walls in highly visible areas should have equal treatment as building exteriors in terms of articulated surface, reveals and applied detailing to visually break-up wall surfaces.
  • Garage doors and vehicle access points into building should not terminate on axial views (i.e. views down streets within the vicinity of the site). 
  • Where axial views are terminated, design consideration should be given to mitigating the visual impact of such views and to otherwise provide a high degree of human scale and visual interest at visual termination points.
  • Doors and entrances into parking garages should not be visually obtrusive and should not be more visually prominent than any principal entrance to the building.
  • Garage entrances should be architecturally integrated into the overall building design with street- level exterior building finishes wrapping into the garage opening for a minimum of 2 metres in depth. 
  • Doors to parking garages should have an architectural treatment that is primarily expressed as an opaque or semi-opaque door rather than an open screen.  Open screens are acceptable if highly detailed and rich in visual interest.
  • Garbage and recycling facilities should be located away from public sidewalks and screened from view.  The materials used for such purposes should be common to the building’s exterior finishes.
  • Surface parking should consider the use of permeable pavers as a means for passive storm water management to control surface water run-off.

8.4.4 Commercial Parking, Loading, Fire and Emergency Access

  • There is to be one access off of Lakeshore Road that will serve as the main entrance for the commercial and hotel uses.
  • Surface parking lots should be exclusively for commercial and retail uses and temporary drop off areas; structured parking (except for drop-off zones) will be created for residential uses.
  • Loading areas for commercial and hotel uses should be consolidated into one area that provides safe and efficient access and minimizes exposure to adjacent commercial uses. 
Signage
  • Building signage should be made of durable, weather-resistant materials, and be professionally fabricated and installed.  No box signs are permitted.
  • The size of any individual sign should follow a common theme of building signage as well as the appearance on an individual building’s facade. 
  • The scale and visual qualities of a building should not be compromised by the size and/or number of building and address signs.
  • Address signage should be of a pedestrian scale that is proportionate to the residential building frontage that it promotes.
  • Free standing entry features that include building / address signage, and that are integrated with a site’s landscape design, should be encouraged. 
  • Any free standing entry feature should be built to internal property lines to ensure a contiguous public open space.
  • Any free standing entry feature, as part of the building design, should be included in the Development Permit package and include detail elevations and material selection.

8.4.5 Commercial Signage

  • Fascia signage should be of a pedestrian scale that is proportionate to the retail frontage that it promotes.
  • Projecting signage should not extend over large areas unless incorporated as part of an awning, with text located within the awning valance.  Letters should be of appropriate scale and size to complement the character of the awning design.
  • The size of any individual sign should follow a common theme of building signage as well as the appearance on an individual building’s facade.
Lighting
  • Illumination should be planned as a key element in a façade’s design with consideration for the effect on the façade and on adjoining buildings and open spaces. 
  • All exterior lighting should follow best practice methods to preserve the Dark Sky by limiting light pollution and to include selection of high performance fixtures that conserve energy. 
  • Lighting should not contribute to glare through use of full cut-off or low-wattage luminaries. 
  • Designs should also incorporate shielded fixtures and/or appropriate mounting heights, as well as be aimed appropriately.
  • Building and wall scone lighting should be in response to the individual building’s architectural character, while complementary to the overall character of the residential area. 
  • Building and parkade entry lighting should be of sufficient illumination levels as to clearly indicate principle entries from secondary, and to provide a high level of “psychological comfort” for persons using each entrance.
  • Directional or accent lighting should be limited to specific exterior feature elements of notable distinction.
  • Street and pedestrian light fixtures should add daytime visual interest and human scale to the exterior environment and be complimentary to the building design, as well as help accentuate the rhythm of the building façade. 
  • Lighting should be designed for high-quality environmental performance.  Only one style of street and pedestrian fixture should be used within the residential areas.
  • Lighting of sidewalks and bike paths adjacent to roadways should provide for continuous and uniform lighting of ground level.

8.4.6 Commercial Lighting

  • Window displays should be lit from the inside of the tenant space with directional lighting such that there is minimum light spillage outside of the tenant space.
Screening and Fencing
  • Areas for consideration for buffering and fencing will be along the property boundary between the CD24 site and the adjacent residential properties and should respond to privacy issues.
  • All buffering and fencing should be an appropriate response to adjacent social interaction, security and safety.
  • A solid privacy fence, along with supplemental planting, should be provided in response to landscape aesthetics and to assist with sound attenuation. 
  • Fence height and landscape buffer screening should be maximized in these areas and meet, as a minimum the City of Kelowna’s Section 7 Landscaping and Screening Level 3 Landscape Buffer Requirements.
  • Level 3 Landscape Buffer Requirements: a minimum 3 metre landscape buffer is required to separate uses from adjacent existing properties and will consist of a vegetative buffer or a continuous opaque barrier.
  • Fencing should be treated simply and in a similar manner between individual parcels and buildings to create a sense of harmony and unification with the residential area. 
  • Ground level private patios should be delineated with fencing of a high quality and durable material (i.e. wood or metal) and should not exceed 1.5 metres in height unless considered as part of a gateway treatment.
  • In all public to semi-private open areas, fencing should be visually permeable and its height should be such that it is not imposing to the pedestrian realm and maintain CPTED sightlines.
  • The use of chain link as a fencing should be discouraged in public open space and private landscaped areas, with the exception of the delineation of the Wilson Creek wetland and riparian corridor.
  • Variations in fence treatment can be presented at the Development Permit stage, and should only be considered when the fence design is in response to a specific microclimate to increase pedestrian comfort or to increase usability of an outdoor space (i.e. patio).

8.4.7 Commercial Screening and Fencing

  • The commercial area and associated parking plaza should be considered as an urban plaza.  As such, the City of Kelowna’s Section 7.0 Landscaping and Screening requirements of surface parking lots should be relaxed in consideration of this higher urban treatment. 
  • No major conflicting land uses are proposed with the commercial area that will require significant screening.  Any requirements to separate adjacent building uses or create exterior territorial definition should be accomplished through planting.
  • Landscape screening and buffer should be considered along the Lakeshore Road corridor in response to any outdoor activities related to commercial uses.  Any planting in close proximity to intersections and pedestrian and vehicle conflict points will respond to visual sight lines and CPTED safety requirements.
  • Outdoor patios should be delineated with decorative fencing of a high quality and durable material (i.e. metal) and should not exceed 1.2 metres in height unless considered as part of a gateway treatment.
Site Access & Connections
  • Primary access into the CD24 site is provided off of Lakeshore Road along with a secondary access off of Bird Place (via a new bridge over Wilson Creek).
  • A secondary vehicular and pedestrian access into the CD24 site will be provided from Springrose Way.
  • Emergency vehicle access into the CD24 site is provided off of Springbrook Road.  This access will provide important emergency access into the CD24 site and improved pedestrian connectivity to the larger community.
  • Circulation and connectivity between the four vehicle access points will consist of an interior road network as part of a bare-land strata development and should be designed in a manner that will reduce the potential for short cutting.
  • All internal roads and access points into / out of the CD24 site should be designed in a manner that promotes pedestrian and cycling in a safe and comfortable public realm environment.
  • Bridge access off Bird Place will include appropriate Wilson Creek environmental approvals in conjunction with the bridge design and construction. 
  • Bridge access off Bird Place will be constructed over Wilson Creek and designed as a gateway entrance to the site and the bridge design should be included as part of the form and character Development Permit application.
  • Bridge access off Bird Place will accommodate pedestrian and cyclists, and the north side approach will also be designed to accommodate a pedestrian crossing of the secondary entry road for the Wilson Creek trail. 
  • For any pedestrian underpass associated with the Bird Place bridge access, consideration should be given to increasing the amounts of pedestrian level lighting under bridge structure and additional considerations for CPTED principles at bridge abutments to minimize potential hiding places.
  • It is anticipated that vehicle access off of Lakeshore Road will be associated with a new controlled intersection which will serve as the main entrance for the commercial and hotel uses. 
  • The Lakeshore Road entry is considered a major pedestrian and commuter cycle connection with safe and convenient access to the adjacent Multi-Use Corridor (MUC) that connects Upper Mission to Downtown. As such, consideration should be given to the commercial plaza and adjacent ground floor retail design for the accommodation of multi-modal movement.

8.4.8 Commercial Site Access and Connections

  • Pedestrian walkways adjacent to ground floor retail should be wide enough to accommodate retail overflow into the public realm frontage zone without restricting pedestrian circulation.
  • The commercial area will be an area where the public is invited to be, and security within public areas should be considered in conjunction with building development. 
  • All security devices such as gates or screens should be located on the inside of the retail frontages.  Corridors or entry ways that need to be secured should be either doors or gates in keeping with the architectural style of the exterior of the building.  Roller gates and shutters are not permitted.
Public and Private Open Space
  • The provision of large usable areas designated for use by CD24 residents should be promoted in the building siting and design of exterior spaces.
  • Private open space should be limited to exterior spaces immediately adjacent to residential units (private patios and balconies) and to principle/ secondary building entrances - to promote a continuous and integrated series of open spaces.
  • In situations where private areas will not be secured, landscape design and planting should create a territorial separation between semi-public and private spaces, without necessitating the use of fencing that will disrupt the visual continuity of the landscaped open spaces; fencing should be provided only when security is an issue.
  • Spatial separation, combined with landscape planting, should be considered in all locations where there is an interface between a road and a building, or a major pedestrian access route and a building. 
  • Open spaces should be highly accessible and primarily promote passive recreational uses such as walking, jogging, cycling, and informal play opportunities.
  • Open spaces should provide for some level of pedestrian scale lighting to promote safety and encourage limited night-time use. 
  • The provision of landscape feature elements such as gazebos, trellises, and pergolas should be encouraged as a way to enhance the visual interest and use of open spaces and should be attractive when viewed from above.
  • A continuous pedestrian connection should be provided to link all major open spaces, including the Wilson Creek wetland and riparian corridor, which limits any potential for pedestrian and vehicle conflicts.
  • Portions of the Wilson Creek’s northern boundary will be reserved as public open space, and will be protected by covenant against development in order to preserve and enhance the creek’s wetland and riparian habitat. 
  • Any new work associated with Wilson Creek’s northern boundary will be designed in a manner to meet City of Kelowna design and construction standards and any environmental mitigation recommendations. 
  • Provision of community gardens should be considered either as part of the overall development’s common open space, or as part of an individual building’s garden space.  Community gardens provide a direct sustainability feature and also create more of a community presence in the development.
  • Community gardens should be considered as part of a private or semi-private open space development and be designed in a manner that provides some level of security and controlled access for users.
  • Provision of structured play areas should be considered either as part of the overall development’s common open space, or as part of an individual building’s garden space.
  • Structured play should consist of play equipment that promoted physical play and social interaction among its users. 
  • Any play equipment should conform to current CSA playground standards and be of high quality design and durable materials and include appropriate safety surfacing. 
  • No black colour rubber tile safety surfacing should be used due to potential heat absorption. 
  • Non-structural retaining walls used in open spaces should not be greater than 1.2 metres in height and made from local stone or of modular/ segmental block construction.
  • Where structural retaining walls are required, exposed faces should be treated in a manner that is complementary with adjacent landscaping and/or architectural details - so as to limit their overall mass, height and visual impact. 
  • Where structural retaining walls are required, exposed faces should be treated in a manner that will discourage graffiti 
  • (i.e. treated with anti-graffiti coating).  Photo image vinyl wraps should be provided on all utility boxes that are susceptible to graffiti (i.e. tagging).

8.4.9 Commercial Public and Private Open Space

  • The Commercial plaza should be fully accessible to the public as it depends on pedestrian and vehicular traffic.  Open spaces within this area should serve either as aesthetic landscaped areas relating to retail activity or routes of access. 
  • The character of the commercial open space should have an “urban plaza character” in support of retail activities and promote a pedestrian friendly environment through spatial continuity between the public and private realms. 
  • The design of open spaces within the commercial plaza should promote social interaction throughout the following site planning considerations: orient the spaces to take advantage of natural sunlight and key views; provide shade and protection from wind and other climatic elements. 
  • Encourage the provision of streetscape elements of greater distinction within the public realm that should incorporate a high level of urban and functional design.  The intent is to create a unique and memorable experience through innovative and creative design.
  • Consideration should be given to placement of streetscape elements within the commercial area’s public realm so as not to create clutter or restrict pedestrian movement. 
  • The public realm for Area “A” should be considered as a series of pedestrian zones in which specific site furnishing, planting and streetscape elements will be located.  Zones may include any of the following:
  • Edge Zone: immediately adjacent to parking and provides a safety buffer for pedestrian against vehicle encroachment; 
  • Furniture and Planting Zone: accommodates street tree planting, lighting, site furniture and other fixed objects; 
  • Pedestrian Clearance Zone: must be kept free of obstructions and provide a continuous linear pathway of an appropriate width to serve anticipated pedestrian flow; 
  • Frontage and Marketing Zone: is the area directly in front of the building and/or property line.  It can be used as flow-out space, patios and outdoor display areas for merchants. 
  • Enhanced Public Realm Zone: is the flexible parking space that can be utilized for seating areas.
  • Consideration should be given to the use of brick pavers as the primary surface treatment to promote a sense of ‘high quality urban design’ and promote passive stormwater management through porous pavement.
  • Consideration should be given to the use of rolled curbing in association with decorative metal bollards in high pedestrian and vehicle circulation areas to define and separate movement while maintaining continuity of paving treatment.
  • Open space areas closer to Lakeshore Road should be used to complement the main signage opportunities and create an aesthetic buffer between the site and the boulevard.
8.5 Landscape Design Guidelines
Pedestrians
  • All major pedestrian walkways within the semi-private and public open spaces should be accessible at all hours and to all users, and conform to best practices for barrier-free design.
  • All internal roads should include sidewalks of a minimum 1.8 metre width. 
  • Wherever possible, sidewalks should be separated by a planted boulevard of minimum 2.0 metre width.
  • All major pedestrian walkways should provide for some level of pedestrian scale lighting to promote safety and encourage limited night-time use. 
  • Pedestrian network should be considered in conjunction with overall roadway network and building siting, so as to maximize interconnectivity between roads private and public open spaces and minimize pedestrian and vehicle conflicts.
  • A hierarchy of pedestrian pathways should be developed in conjunction with overall pedestrian network system.  Paving surface treatment and pathway widths should be used as part of the pedestrian hierarchy. 
  • Consideration should be given for the following pathway hierarchy system; 
    • brick pavers in urban areas where pedestrian and vehicles have equal importance; 
    • concrete paving for major pathways and sidewalks within public realm; 
    • combination concrete and brick paving for pathways within the private realm; 
    • asphalt paving for multi-modal and high traffic pathways in natural areas; 
    • compacted crushed granular in low traffic natural areas.
  • Public realm should provide site furnishing, comfort amenities, shade trees, low level planting, and landscape / urban design elements that will create a pedestrian friendly streetscape environment and promote pedestrian use.
  • Pedestrian crosswalks should be treated in a manner that provides paving contrast, in an aesthetically pleasing manner, between pedestrian zones within roadway. 
  • Pedestrian crosswalks paving treatment should be limited to:
    • stamped and tinted concrete, 
    • wear-resistant thermal plastic traffic patterns (i.e. SquareOne Paving),
    • or at minimum, painted zebra lines. 
Cycling
  • Bike paths for recreation, commuter bike lanes and multi-use shared bike and pedestrian corridors shall promote alternative modes of transportation and increased physical activity that provides a direct sustainability feature to the CD24 site, and also creates more of a community presence in the development.
  • Pathway connections into the CD24 site should take full advantage of the adjacent Lakeshore Multi-Use Corridor (MUC) that connects Upper Mission to Downtown.  As such, consideration should be given to the Commercial Plaza and adjacent ground floor retail design for the accommodation of multi-modal movement.
  • Given the residential nature of the development, with lower traffic volumes when compared to city collector and arterial roads, no painting should be required to delineate commuter bike lanes on internal roads.
  • Bollards are recommended in areas where separated bike paths join-up with vehicle intersections as a way to encourage the slowing down and dismounting of cyclists before crossing roadway.
Wayfinding and Signage
  • Buildings in the residential area should have adequate directional signage at the main entries to the CD24 site. 
  • All of the internal roads will be private roads and should be properly named and addressed to orient and direct local residents and visitors within the development.
  • A logical addressing system should be developed in conjunction with the City of Kelowna and the emergency response providers, to ensure that each building or cluster of town houses is easily identifiable. 
  • Any wayfinding and directional signage associated with the Wilson Creek wetland and riparian corridor should be coordinated with the City of Kelowna’s wayfinding and park signage requirements.
Wilson Creek Green Space Landscaping
  • Portions of the Wilson Creek’s northern boundary will be reserved as public open space, and will be protected by covenant against development in order to preserve and enhance the creek’s wetland and riparian habitat. 
  • Private open space landscaping adjacent to the Wilson Creek Green Space should consist primarily of native and indigenous plant species in natural plant groupings that is complementary of the public open space treatment for the adjacent Wilson Creek wetland and riparian corridor. 
  • Private patios adjacent to the Wilson Creek Green Space should provide some fencing in response to security and delineation of private and public spaces. 
  • Private patio spaces should be delineated with decorative fencing of a high quality and durable material (i.e. metal, glass) and should not exceed 1.2 metres in height unless considered as part of a gateway treatment.
  • Private patio fencing should encourage views to the adjacent naturalized landscape and be constructed in a manner that minimizes its opaqueness.
  • Non-structural retaining walls used in open spaces should not be greater than 1.2 metres in height and made from local stone or of modular/ segmental block construction. 
Community Gardens
  • Provision of community gardens should be considered either as part of the overall development’s common open space, or as part of an individual building’s garden space.  Community gardens provide a direct sustainability feature and also create more of a community presence in the development.
  • Maintenance agreements between developers and users should be developed in coordination with the establishment of any community garden, to ensure proper stewardship, access control and visual tidiness of these unique garden spaces.
  • The provision of landscape feature elements such as gazebos, trellises, and a storage shed should be encouraged to enhance the visual interest and functionality of the community gardens, and should be attractive when viewed from above.
Street Tree Planting
  • Street trees can significantly contribute to the overall beauty and increased property values of the CD24 site and therefore should be provide wherever possible.
  • Street trees should be of a deciduous species that has a non-aggressive root habit and tolerant of urban conditions (i.e. road salt) with a minimum 7.5 cm (3”) caliper size measured at Circumference at Breast Height (CBH). 
  • At minimum, street tree selection should be cross-referenced to the City of Kelowna’s Tree Selection Guidelines for appropriateness of tree species.
  • Street tree species selection should be suitable for the Okanagan climate and growing conditions and have been grown locally.  
  • Street tree species selection should celebrate seasonal variations through changing colour of leaves, winter and summer bark and branching interest, etc.
  • Street tree species selection should provide enough diversity of species as to protect against the spread of disease and pests that can devastate monoculture plantings (i.e. Dutch Elm disease).
  • Street tree planting (i.e species and spacing) should be treated in a similar manner on both sides of the internal road ROW to create a unified appearance.
  • Changes in street tree species should be in logical locations such as roadway intersections, changes in road directions, and termination of key roadway vistas. Avoid random or multiple specie changes along a single stretch of roadway.
  • Soil volumes for street tree planting should be maximized to increase the area available for root growth. 
  • Consideration should be given to providing continuous soil trenches, root zone break-out areas to adjacent green spaces, structural soil, and use of suspended pavement systems such as SilvaCell® as possible strategies of increasing soil volumes. 
  • Wherever possible, all trees should be offset back from sidewalk and major utility services by a minimum of 2.0 metres measured from edge of conflict to edge of tree rootball. If not possible root barriers should be used.
  • Root barriers should be provided at critical root zones areas adjacent to sidewalks, utilities and other vulnerable infrastructure, to direct surface roots downward and away from potential conflicts.
  • All street trees should be irrigated with an automatic underground irrigation system. System controls and zoning should be such as to allow trees to be irrigated independently of other planting. 
  • All irrigation should conform to the highest standards and irrigation best practices for reduced water consumption and usage.
  • Drip and Drip manifold should be the preferred method of irrigation, to eliminate water loss due to over-spraying and evaporation and provide equal distribution of water directly to the root zone area.
Landscape Planting
  • Landscape planting (including trees) should include species adapted and suitable for the Okanagan’s hot-dry climate and growing conditions and have been grown locally.  
  • Plant material should be of various species and genus as to provide a high level of visual and seasonal interest in form, colour and texture. 
  • Landscape trees should be large enough at maturity to create a park-like setting, especially along roadside boulevards.
  • Plant material should be specified at a sufficient installation sizes as to provide an immediate landscape impact.
  • Planting areas should include a mixture of deciduous and evergreen plants in combinations of perennials, ornamental grasses, shrubs, and trees in response a building’s specific exterior space programming and buffering requirements.
  • All planting should conform to the BC Landscape Standards, current edition, for minimum plant and installation specifications.
  • All planting should be irrigated with an automatic underground irrigation system. System controls and zoning should be such as to allow planting to be irrigated independently of landscape trees and street tree planting. 
  • All irrigation should conform to the highest standards and irrigation best practices for reduced water consumption and usage.
  • Drip and Drip manifold should be the preferred method of irrigation, to eliminate water loss due to over-spraying and evaporation and provide equal distribution of water directly to the root zone area.